Category Archives: Events

Pastries with the Profs Event Mar. 23

It’s back! Our biannual “Pastries with the Professors” event.

Are you an English major or minor? Are you considering a major or minor in English?

Nosh on pastries and juice.  Meet the Professors. Get information on classes offered by the English Department next semester. Learn about  the programs of study you can pursue: Liberal Arts, English Education, and Professional Writing.

Monday, March 23, 2015
9:00 am – 11:00 am
Founders Hall 105 (Faculty Lounge)

FMU to Host a Wikipedia Edit-a-Thon

FMU will host a Wikipedia Edit-a-Thon on March 11 from 12-5 PM in the Rogers Library. The event is part of FMU’s “G-Week” or “Gender Week,” which is aimed at getting the campus thinking (and talking) productively about gender and sexuality–in all their expressions.

Wikipedia Logo

The goal of the edit-a-thon is to increase the presence and participation of women and GLBTQ on Wikipedia, one of the world’s most visited websites.

Attendees will write, edit, index, and/or add references to Wikipedia articles about issues associated with women and GLBTQ, especially those related to South Carolina and racial and ethnic minorities.

The edit-a-thon is open the FMU community; no prior Wikipedia writing or editing experience is necessary to participate. However, attendees must register for the event and get a Wikipedia account in advance.

Wikipedia’s lack of diversity is well-documented. Women make up only 8-16% of Wikipedia contributors to the site according to various estimates. Some have argued that this gender gap creates a coverage gap on the site: entries tend to focus on men or stereotypically masculine topics. Wikipedia’s race- and sexuality-gaps are even more pronounced than its gender gap.

Wikipedia’s gender gap is improving. A recent study has shown that the English-language Wikipedia has roughly the same number of entries about women as it does about men. The entries about women, though, tend to focus more on their family, children (or lack thereof), and relationship status.

The FMU edit-a-thon is part of a larger, international effort that Wikipedia itself supports. Subjects on the site should be represented accurately, objectively, and evenly. As professors Sarah Adams (Yale) and Hannah Brückner (NYU of Abu Dhabi) explain, given the sheer volume of traffic to the site, Wikipedia is perhaps the “most important reference tool and information clearinghouse” in the world. Moreover, Adams and Brückner point out that “[Wikipedia] is widely used in American and other countries’ secondary schools and universities. It is an important go-to site for many students who are trying to learn about topics that are new to them.”

FMU English Studies professors are well aware that students of all ages consult Wikipedia when completing research projects. Composition classes like English 200 often ask students to compose a research-based, argumentative essay. During these assignments, professors help students evaluate the objectivity and credibility of sources. Wikipedia often does not qualify as an appropriate source for many types of college-level academic writing, including English 200 essays. However, many professors teaching college composition endorse consulting Wikipedia during the initial research stage. During this part of the process, the researcher seeks a broad overview of his subject as well as keywords that relate to it. She then uses this information to conduct more targeted, informed research using library-based resources, such as peer-reviewed journal articles and books.

Ultimately, increasing the presence and participation of women and GLBTQ on Wikipedia will create a more objective, complete resource that is popular the world over. Adams and Brückner say it best: “Knowledge is power, as the adage has it, and a well-informed citizenry is the basis of a vibrant economy and strong democracy.”

If you’re in the FMU community and have questions about the event, email co-organizers Dr. Mica Hilson and Dr. Amy Rubens of FMU English Studies or public services librarian Ms. Tammy Ivins, MSLS.

Note: The organizers are indebted to the pioneering work of scholar and prolific Wikipedian Dr. Adrianne Wadewitz. Dr. Wadewitz passed away following a rock climbing accident last year. Learn more about Dr. Wadewtiz and her work with Wikipedia, especially on college campuses.

 

Career Information Session for Majors, Minors, and Collaterals

“So what are you going to do with that?”

You might hear that question from family and friends quite often if you are pursuing some type of certification in English studies.

Actually, career options are boundless for students who are earning a major, minor, or collateral in one of the department’s programs, including Liberal Arts, Professional Writing, Secondary English Education, Creative Writing, and Writing and Language. 

Learn more at an upcoming career information session on February 26, 2015 from 3:30-4:30 PM in Founders Hall 111-A.

Pastries with the Profs Recap

This post was written by Dr. Veenstra, Assistant Director of Composition.

On Monday, October 20, the English Department hosted Pastries with Professors, a regular event that brings together students and professors with the lure of delicious goodies and information about English courses offered next semester.

Dr. Kellye Corcoran shows off the course schedule she handed out to students throughout the morning.

Dr. Kellye Corcoran shows off the course schedule she handed out to students throughout the morning while English Major Monica Gibbs (background) grabs some juice and handouts. 

This semester’s gathering had a strong turnout, with over 35 faculty and 50 students in attendance.  Among the students were those with majors or minors in English, Education, and Professional Writing.  These students met professors who will teach specific classes in the spring. For example, Dr. Kellye Corcoran explained to students her ENG 328 class, which promises a “sassy” take on Neoclassical British Literature and will include film clips that paint vivid portraits of life in the 18th century.  Other students got guidance about how to structure the courses they’ll need to take over the next few years.  There were also several non-English majors who stopped by to get a copy of the Schedule of Courses for Spring 2015 while snacking on some sweetness.  A few professors encouraged their whole classes to visit, and many of the students in Dr. Linda Jacobs’ Shakespeare class did so. 

Dr. Lynn Hanson, Director of the Professional Writing Program, chats with Nkili Gause, while Dr. Linda Jacobs shares a laugh with students.

Dr. Lynn Hanson, Director of the Professional Writing Program, chats with Nkili Gause, while Dr. Linda Jacobs shares a laugh with students.

Niki Gause, a sociology major with collaterals in professional writing and psychology, talked with several professors about courses and bragged about her successes with the professional writing program.  As a student employee who works with both the Orientation Office and Campus Police, she has learned that, in her words, “communication is key” to success in the working world.  People don’t realize how important good speaking and writing are, she says, and she explained how she has benefitted from her training in professional writing.  By crafting an informative and purpose-driven memo about a discrepancy in her paycheck (she had worked 12 hours but only got paid for four), she got to the root of the problem: one of her timecards had been lost.  She was pleased to be able to tell this success story of how her writing helped solve a problem and gave her a clear reward: more money.  In contrast, she has noticed how unprofessional communication can be confusing and frustrating.  Since she frequently interacts with prospective and new students as well as their parents, she has seen badly worded emails that read more like texting shorthand than formal messages.    

Another attendee was Nisheeka Simmons, a Writing Center tutor who brought an ENG 111 student she is working with in the Write on Target program.  Although he is a business major, Julian grabbed a donut and a schedule, taking some time to plan out his Spring semester, along with a few of his teammates from the soccer team. 

Elementary Education major Rachel Keefe grabs some juice while English Education majors Jennifer Coker and Chandler Bundy dig into some pastries.

Elementary Education major Rachel Keefe grabs some juice while English Education majors Jennifer Coker and Chandler Bundy dig into some pastries.

Maybe it was all the sugar and coffee, or maybe the combination of so many great personalities, but the room was full of energy and smiles.  For both professors and students, it was a great opportunity to connect with each other outside the classroom. 

 

Pastries with the Profs Event on Oct. 20

It’s back! Our biannual “Pastries with the Professors” event.

Are you an English major or minor? Are you considering a major or minor in English?

Nosh on pastries and juice.  Meet the Professors. Get information on classes offered by the English Department next semester. Learn about  the programs of study you can pursue: Liberal Arts, English Education, and Professional Writing.

CC-licensed photo by flickr user Kanko

CC-licensed photo by flickr user Kanko

Monday, October 20, 2014
9:00 am – 11:00 am
Founders Hall 105 (Faculty Lounge)

Can’t make it? Read about the professors and course offerings online.

Mouth watering in anticipation? Check out pictures from last spring’s event.

FMU Writing Center Announces September Events

The FMU Writing Center has several events coming up in September for FMU students, staff, and faculty:

  • Avoiding Plagiarism: 2:30 p.m., Mon., Sept. 8, in CEMC 114 (Workshop)
  • Writing for Sciences – Lab Reports: 3:45 p.m., Thurs., Sept. 11, in CEMC 114 (Workshop)
  • Building Sentences: 2:30 p.m., Mon., Sept. 15, in FH 114B (Workout)
  • Using MLA Format: 2:30 p.m., Wed., Sept. 17, in CEMC 114 (Workshop)
  • Using APA Format: 3:45 p.m., Thurs., Sept. 25, in CEMC 114 (Workshop)

As always, Writing Center staff are available in FH 114-C throughout the semester for one-to-one tutorials. FMU students, staff, and faculty are welcome to book face-to-face and online appointments through the Writing Center’s website. Evening tutorials (no appointment needed) are offered at the FMU Tutoring Center (LSF 107) from 5:00-8:00 p.m., Mondays through Thursdays.

More questions? Stop by the Writing Center in FH 114-C.

Dr. Kunka, FMU Writing Center Director, and Dr. Reynolds, FMU Writing Center Assistant Director

Fall 2014 English Film Series

The Fall Film Series has a wonderful line-up this semester. Take a look at the schedule below. Faculty and students with questions about the film series should contact organizer Dr. Smolen-Morten

From the 1941 trailer for _The Maltese Falcon_ showing Humphrey Bogart. Image in the public domain.

From the 1941 trailer for _The Maltese Falcon_ showing Humphrey Bogart. Image in the public domain.

September 23, 2014.  John Huston, The Maltese Falcon (1941) 100 mins.

Hard-noised private detective Sam Spade unravels the tangled plots of an unsavory lot chasing a jewel encrusted statue. Quintessential film noir: dark alleys, a femme fatale, justified paranoia, and an American culture bereft of a moral compass. Humphrey Bogart, Mary Astor, Sydney Greenstreet.

3:35 & 7:30 pm, Lowrimore Auditorium, Cauthen Educational Media Center.

October 21, 2014.  Jean-Marc Vallée, Dallas Buyers Club (2013) 117mins.*

With 67 awards, including Oscars for best actor and supporting actor, this biopic entertains and challenges audiences. Suffering from AIDS, Ron Woodroof brings unapproved and illegal drugs into Texas, where he sells them to other AIDS victims and learns compassion for people he had rejected.

3:35 & 7:30 pm, Lowrimore Auditorium, Cauthen Educational Media Center.

On the set of _The Seventh Seal_ in 1957. Photo in the public domain.

On the set of _The Seventh Seal_ in 1957. Photograph in the public domain.

November 18, 2014. Ingmar Bergman, The Seventh Seal (1957) 96 mins.

A cult classic, The Seventh Seal made Bergman an international star and the darling of the European avant-garde. A medieval knight returns to his native Sweden, where he grapples with existential questions, like the existence and nature of God, and plays chess with Death. A must see for film buffs.

3:35 & 7:30 pm, Lowrimore Auditorium, Cauthen Educational Media Center.

*Dallas Buyer’s Club will be presented with help from FMU Gender Studies.